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Microsoft is keen to point out that with Windows Phone it has the device that IT organisations want to roll out to customers and that BYOD is no longer a stumbling block.It would be ironic if at the same time the increasing attractiveness of the Nokia phones led to consumer pull anyway.Intel is about to muscle up, scale down, and take a serious shot at marginalising Apple's iPad among business buyers.The campaign started at Computex with the launch of the Core M just-for-typoslabs 14nm silicon.It is important to understand that Core-M is not just a new piece of “marketechture”. Instead it is a fully-fledged platform/brand with the same stature of the Centrino moniker Intel used to denote the presence of integrated WiFi in laptops of the early 2000s.* The 14nm Broadwell-based Core M is all about four things:Intel has focussed its efforts on bringing those qualities to typoslabs, aka two-in-one laptops whose screens separate to become tablets, because it wants to make sure such devices represent a strong alternative to tablets and especially tablets running ARM chippery.

Chipzilla's plans rests on the vPro version of the Core M. The extra manageability vPro brings to the typoslab platform will be pitched squarely at businesses, especially those contemplating or already implementing bring your own device regimes.The Reg has beheld Intel's Core-M-powered Llama Mountain reference design for business typoslabs. If OEMs improve on it even a little, it will allow the creation of very attractive devices because it already offers a colossal and light tablet. Intel has hinted to us that it expects to see very interesting creations based on Llama Mountain by the end of the year. ASUS has already shown OEMs are willing to get mighty innovative, if a bit weird, with its five-in-one Windows/Android/phone/typoslab/tablet.Intel and partners will point out, pointedly, that it is entirely possible for end-users to be very productive even if they can't have an iPad. We can expect Apple's iOS to be portrayed as an unwelcome silo of hard-to-manage quirkiness, never mind that it now runs Office. A subtext will point out that employees' kids are as excited, or maybe more so, about the prospect of a BYOD iPad coming home than employees themselves. Which isn't really the point of BYOD, is it?

Windows typoslabs will be positioned as the best of all possible words. Workers get a tablet that – thanks to its dual role as a laptop screen – has a larger display than current iPads.Managers get the knowledge their team always have a mobile device capable of running the applications they've built for Windows. Even demanding applications will be fine – if Intel can get its fan docks that allow Core M to run at its highest clock speed accepted by OEMs and buyers.IT departments get PCs everywhere, which whether they particularly enjoy it or not is a mode of operations with which they should be familiar. IT folks will also be freed from the need to contemplate new middleware – yes, we're looking at YOU, Citrix and VMware – to funnel apps to fondleslabs.Surface is one of Microsoft's contributions to the pincer movement, because its mere existence helps to legitimise the typoslab concept. Redmond also provides the cloud services needed to make mobile working less dependent on the C: Drive, and therefore more resilient.

Universal applications, Redmond's plans for write-once, run on PCs-and-smartmobes, helps things along by making it easier to bring apps into typoslabs.Yes, Microsoft isn't helping things by offering Office on the iPad, as doing so gives Apple's creation a more natural place in business. But typoslabs' keyboards mean it is possible to use more of the suite's features in the field. Expect this to be pointed out with messaging about typoslabs being grand tools for content consumption and content creation.The stars are lining up for Intel's assault, as the tablet market is already cooling off, as are iPad sales. Anecdotally, the slowdown is because users are tired of schlepping three devices around all day.Intel and friends will try to take advantage of those circumstances and the fact that first-and-second-generation iPads are now approaching end-of-life to make the Windows typoslab the IT department's replacement of choice.

For 14 years, The Register has been chronicling the publicity stunts of Kevin Warwick, an attention-seeking academic with a sideline in self-mutilation*. In fact, Warwick has been making improbable claims to the press for much longer than that: over twenty years. But the world has continued to relay Warwick's stunts and soundbytes unskeptically.This week, the realisation may have belatedly dawned on much of the mainstream media that a Kevin Warwick claim needs to be taken with a mine's worth of salt. The "science" proves (or disproves) very little, and his predictions are frequently a load of cock. Former BBC science man David Whitehouse reminded everyone via Twitter this week that as far back as 1991, Warwick was predicting "real life Terminators" within ten years.What did it this time is Warwick's claim that the "Turing Test" - which measures ability of a machine to convincingly mimic a human while communicating with real humans in a blind test - had been passed at an event Warwick had organised and hosted. This had all the hallmarks of a Warwick stunt - you only had to look.

Warwick told the media that the landmark had been achieved using a "supercomputer" - when it fact it was a simple AI chatbot program running on a laptop. The chatbot's developer had tried and failed many times to convince humans it was human. This time, the academic luminaries chosen to judge the Test included a retired advertising being with no scientific background (now a Lib Dem peer) and, um … the TV actor and former shoemaker Robert Llewellyn, whose cybernetics qualifications consist of having played the neurotic robot Kryten in Red Dwarf.Only a third of the judges were actually persuaded that the chatbot was a 13-year old Ukrainian speaking English as a second language. Again, as Dr Whitehouse points out, it isn't hard to imitate a 13-year old.Warwick's latest stunt is a vivid example of Jaron Lanier's observation that to be impressed by computer AI, we first have to make ourselves pretty stupid."You can't tell if a machine has gotten smarter or if you've just lowered your own standards of intelligence to such a degree that the machine seems smart," wrote Lanier in You Are Not A Gadget. "People degrade themselves in order to make machines seem smart all the time."

[Or we might paraphrase the cruel but popular description of Stephen Fry and say that what we have here is a stupid person's idea of an intelligent machine - Ed].For some judges this proved less difficult than others. The Turing Test cuts both ways: so far from being a test of how intelligent the software is, it's a test of how intelligent the judge is - or the media reporting the contest.At first the reporting was uncritical. Gosh, wow – and how about that – wrote the Guardian. And the Daily Mail. And the BBC.Today everyone has sobered up. Rollo, a chatbot creation of the fantastically misanthropic and rather evasive AI software developer Rollo Carpenter (I talked to him here) had previously achieved a 59.3 per cent kiddology score, as New Scientist points out. The Guardian has performed a reverse ferret.And now we can see the transcripts, we can see how low the judges dumbed themselves down. Asked by the bot 'Eugene' where the judge lived, this exchange followed:For years, Warwick's Wikipedia entry was the subject of furious edit wars, with many amendments made from a computer at Reading University, where Warwick lectures. Which has all rather put Kevin Warwick under the microscope.

How has Warwick contrived to gather so much publicity? Well, he stays away just long enough for people to forget who he is. For years, his Wikipedia entry listed the skeptical reaction that greeted his publicity stunts - and his popular nickname, Captain Cyborg, conferred upon him by this very publication. (Edits hyping his own claims could be sourced to his own University). Now it's almost completely scrubbed clean, again.Most journalists and researchers don't get further than the top paragraph of a Wikipedia entry. But perhaps most of all, editors and producers desperately want to believe his claims are plausible.* He installed a chip in his arm, for instance, and claimed that he had become the advanced guard of the Terminators thereby.The new release will be welcomed by gamers and laptop owners, as the operating system is now said to suspend and resume operations rather more quickly. There's also support for Sony's DualShock 4 controller and improved drivers for some graphics cards.On a more serious note, there's now support for the AVX-512 instructions expected to debut in Intel's 2015 “Knight's Landing” many core architecture chippery, which will bring up to 72 Atom cores onto a single board.

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